Alarms

Image of the Alarms tab in Consibio Cloud

Background & Definitions


In Consibio Cloud an alarm is an object which allows the user to get notifications when certain events happen.

For instance, a user can setup an alarm and get notified with an SMS when a temperature-sensor measures 25 °C. This can be useful in situations where you’re running experiments and you want to know if your experiment is not behaving as expected.

A user can also setup an alarm which triggers when a device (sensor or actuator) is offline.
This can reduce anxiety of production managers since it is their job to ensure that the production is always running. This way, a power outage can be detected immediately without spending unnecessary time in the user-interface.

So put simple – An alarm notifies the user

Alarm Types


The type of alarm is decided by when the user wants to receive a notification. Depending on what should trigger the alarm / notification, the alarm type will vary.

In Consibio Cloud, there are two alarm types available – a value limit alarm and an offline device alarm.

Value Limit Alarm

  • Definition: Triggers when a measured value is outside a defined limit (“out-of-range”)
  • Example: A temperature-alarm that triggers when the room temperature is above 25 °C

Device Offline Alarm

  • Definition: Triggers when a device has gone offline
  • Example: An “offline pump alarm” that triggers when there is a power outage or loss of internet to a pump (i.e. actuator) device

Alarm Settings


Notify By

This setting can be changed to three different states – Do Not Notify, E-mail or SMS.

1. Do Not Notify

Here, the user is not notified with a personal message with the alarm.
However, if the alarm triggers, the user can see a message in the “Recent Alarm” section within the “Dashboard” tab of the specific Consibio Cloud Project. An example could like the following:

Recent alarm trigger. Depending on when the alarm occurred, it will show up in the different sub-sections.

Any alarm will show up in this section, but when the Notify By setting is set to Do Not Notify, the message will be viewable from here.

2. E-Mail

When the user chooses to get notified by E-mail, an email will be sent to the user’s email-address registered within Consibio Cloud (The same mail which is used to login to your Consibio Cloud user).

If you are unaware which email is registered, you can always check the account settings tab by clicking on your profile name in the top right-hand corner of the web-application. (On mobile, press the “Account” button)

A typical example of how an alarm by email will look like, can be seen below

Example of an alarm trigger message / notification received through email

3. SMS

When the user chooses to get notified by SMS, an SMS will be sent to the user’s mobile phone registered within Consibio Cloud.

If you are unaware which mobile phone number is registered, you can always check the account settings tab by clicking on your profile name in the top right-hand corner of the web-application. (On mobile, press the “Account” button)

A typical example of how an alarm by SMS will look like, can be seen below

Example of an alarm trigger message / notification received on a mobile phone.

Private Alarm

In a Consibio Cloud project, it is possible to have an alarm that is visible to all members within the project (i.e. public) but the alarm can also be private to your own user as well.

So there are two options to this “Private Alarm” setting:

  1. The alarm is private to your user only, if the setting is “True”.
  2. The alarm is public to all members of the Consibio Cloud project, if the setting is set to “False”.

It is important to notice, that just because an alarm is public (or private), a user still has to subscribe to that alarm to get notified. This is done in the Notify By setting.

Alarm Type

In the settings, the alarm type can be chosen. For further description, see the overall Alarm Types section above

Alarm Parameter

In order for an alarm to trigger, the Alarm Parameter setting must be filled-in. As an example, an offline device alarm will not trigger unless the device / parameter has been selected from the drop-down menu.

Notice – the alarm parameter settings can also be based on a virtual sensor instead of a physical device. For more information on this, see the virtual sensors documentation

Lower Limit

This setting will only be available if the alarm type is set to “Value Limits”.

The Lower Limit setting indicates a lower-level threshold for the alarm. This means that the alarm will trigger if the chosen process value (e.g. temperature, CO2-level etc.) is below a certain value.

An example could be a temperature-alarm that should trigger a notification if the measured temperature (alarm parameter) is lower than 24 °C (lower limit).

Upper Limit

This setting will only be available if the alarm type is set to “Value Limits”.

The Lower Limit setting indicates an upper-level threshold for the alarm. This means that the alarm will trigger if the chosen process value (e.g. temperature, CO2-level etc.) is above a certain value.

An example could be a temperature-alarm that should trigger a notification if the measured temperature (alarm parameter) is more than 11 °C (upper limit).

Max. Offline Time

This setting will only be available if the alarm type is set to “Device Offline” and if the Notify By setting is either set to “SMS” or “e-mail” notification.

Sometimes, a device can be offline for a short amount of time (less than a few minutes) due to bad internet connection or a periodic power outage.

In order to not have an alarm trigger when this happens, a maximum offline time can be used to set an amount of time the device / parameter should be turned off, before the alarm should trigger. The lowest maximum offline time is 0.5 hours

Minimum Notification Interval

This setting will only be available if the Notify By setting is either set to “SMS” or “e-mail” notification.

The minimum notification interval setting adjusts the time between consecutive notifications from the same alarm triggering over and over again.

Let’s say a device is offline due to unexpected power outage for several days and you have set up an offline device alarm with SMS notification. Potentially, you could get a SMS every second hour for several days. However, if you only want a SMS once a day during this power outage, the minimum notification interval can be adjusted to 24 h.